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home page of the children's museum of richmond

“Did you know that you can help build a child’s brain – starting even before babies can talk? Simple serve and return interactions between adults and young children help make strong connections in developing brains. And, it’s easy and fun to do! This how-to video breaks down serve and return into 5 simple steps (from Filming Interactions to Nurture Development) and features adults and young children doing each step together.”

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home page of the children's museum of richmond

“One of the most essential experiences in shaping the architecture of the developing brain is “serve and return” interaction between children and significant adults in their lives. Young children naturally reach out for interaction through babbling, facial expressions, and gestures, and adults respond with the same kind of vocalizing and gesturing back at them. This back-and-forth process is fundamental to the wiring of the brain, especially in the earliest years.

This video is from Three Core Concepts in Early Development, a three-part video series from the Center and the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child.”

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home page of the children's museum of richmond

“The science of child development points to three core principles that can guide what society needs to do to help children and families thrive. These include:

  1. Supporting responsive relationships
  2. Strengthening core life skills
  3. Reducing sources of stress

Play in early childhood is an effective way of supporting all three of these principles. In this video, learn more about how play can foster children’s resilience to hardship, and how the complex interactions involved when children play help build their brains.”

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home page of the children's museum of richmond

“RICHMOND, Va. — The Basics Learning Network supports early learning and brain development for very young children. It’s something used in Chesterfield County and other Virginia school districts to start the building blocks of learning.

“Our Little Farm was up for renovation, so we very intentionally built the little farm components to align with The Basics,” Children’s Museum of Richmond (CMoR) Director of Education Krista Dawson said.”

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“RICHMOND- Early childhood champions throughout the Richmond region are getting back to The Basics… literally! A wide variety of nonprofit organizations, social services and government agencies, school systems and healthcare entities are rallying around The Basics, which are five simple and powerful things that parents, caregivers, and child care providers can do to help young children thrive in the early years.”

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home page of chesterfield county

“Nonprofit organizations, social services and government agencies, school systems and healthcare entities are rallying around The Basics- give simple things parents, caregivers, and child care providers can do to help young children thrive.

The Basics provide the framework and tools for interacting with little learners in fun and meaningful ways.”

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logo for FACE: Office of Family And Community Engagement, Chesterfield Public Schools

“Early childhood champions throughout the Richmond region are getting back to The Basics…literally! A wide variety of nonprofit organizations, social services and government agencies, school systems and healthcare entities are rallying around The Basics, which are five simple and powerful things that parents, caregivers and child care providers can do to help young children thrive in the early years.”

Click here to read the whole story!

home page of the virginia museum of fine arts

“A number of local organizations, including several from Henrico, have partnered to promote what they call “The Basics” – five simple principles that parents and caregivers can use to help young children thrive in the early years.

The five principles of The Basics are:

• Maximize love, manage stress;
• Talk, sing, and point;
• Count, group, and compare;
• Explore through movement and play;
• Read and discuss stories.

The Basics are designed to give parents and caregivers tools to encourage brain development long before a child starts formal schooling in kindergarten.”

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